1.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.13-24,  2021-03-30.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: Thisis a summaryguide to 51 books of Richmond Robin Readers, which seemto be targeted at teenage learners of English, judging from the ages of the protagonists: 12 or 13 to 19years old in accordancewith the levels from 1 (300 headwords) to 6 (1800 headwords). The characteristics of this series are asfollows:1) Afifth of the storiesare set in Australiawhose indigenousanimals such as crocodiles and kangaroos are effectively used in Jane Bowring's Cousins and CrocodilesandJames Roy's Broken Wing. 2)Half of the books are about the teen protagonistsfighting against adult criminals, mainly robbers. Althoughsomeof themare quite humorouslikeDeniseKirby's Black Night, othersare unexpectedly seriouslikePauline O'Carolan'sRide for Your LifeandDeadly Holiday. A unique writer, Ms. O'Carolanprefers describingevil doings of abnormal peoplelikean arsonist, a stalker and even a serial killer. 3) Many of the stories are based on the protagonists' newly foundleisure activities such as skiing, scuba diving, horse riding, orienteering,ballooning,yachting, and rafting, out of which powerful stories like Ms. Kirby's Hot Airand Sue Murray's Wild Waterwere born.Since those recreational experiences are not so hard to be accessible to teenagers, they willprobably enjoyreading such rather approachableadventures.Otherrecommended books you cannot miss in this series are Sue Murray's CHOIR Boy(a good-looking boy robot causesa lot of trouble at school), Sam Bowring's InSarah's Dreams(a girl fights back the bully in her dreams), Philip Voysey's The RainbowGirl(anoutcast, hunchback girl kills a monster for hervillage), and DeniseKirby'sWhat Happened at Seacliffe(through the visit to her rich cousinsin England,an Australian female studentgets to know that herancestor was robbed of his inheritanceand forciblysent to the faraway land as a criminal most probably by his own brother). 続きを見る
2.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.25-36,  2021-03-30. 
概要: For the sake of the Japanese learners of English who love reading, thispaperintroduces three different seriesof readers: Garnet Oracle Readers, Summertown Readers, and National Geographic's Global Issues. Garnet Oracle and Summertown are both so-called graded readers. The former arefor highschool and university students who studyEnglish as a foreign or second languagewhile the latter arewritten for businesspeople who have to learn Englishas a lingua franca. Both are,however, original fictionalstories, some of which are quite enjoyable and really worth reading. Peter Viney,Garnet's main author,can write a variety of genres: for example, Space Romanceis aromantic sci-fi story in an impressivesetting; A Tidy Ghostis a witty ghost story whose terror dramatically changes into sheerhumor at the ending; but,above all,his Undergroundis highly recommended because of the unforgettable character Tommy, amute elderly man who lives in the Londonunderground, saving theprotagonist in big trouble.Summertown's counterpart must be James Schofield. Although his amateurish suspense stories tend to be rather boring, his humorous stories such as Room Serviceand Double Troubleare readable with a lot oflaughter. National Geographic's Global Issuesmayseem to be nocomparison with these interesting stories since they are serious nonfiction pamphlets editedfor American high school students. Despite the foreign language, Japanesestudents can also appreciate the discussed, grave environmental problemsofourplanetEarth where the population explosion has been causing disastroussituations. In a sense, fact is truly stranger than fiction. So, which is more interesting, fiction or nonfiction?Ihope you readthe three seriesand decide for yourself. 続きを見る
3.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.37-48,  2021-03-30.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: Sidney Sheldon(1917-2007),a legendarybest-selling American novelistof romantic suspense, was also very popular inJapan. According to the top ten listsincluding Japanese authors, his nameappeared for 7 consecutive years from 1988to 1994. This unbreakable record is generally assumedby Japanese critics,who areapparently unfamiliarwith hiswork,to bethanks to the unique translational methodcalled "cho-yaku" (literally, super-translation)invented by TatsuyukiTENMA(pen name of KunioMASHIKO),a kind of techniqueenabling anAmerican novelto look like one originally writtenin Japanese. Mr.Tenma, as the presidentof the publishing house Academy Shuppan, seems to have builta close relationship with SidneySheldon, getting his trust and permission to translatenot only mostof Sheldon'swell-known 18 novelsbut also rare ones unpublishedin the United States such as Man on the Run, The Dictator, and The Revenge. The Chase(1984), in whichMasao, the 18-year-old Japanese heir to aSony-likeinternational company,surviveswith asamurai spirithis uncle's devilish plot in the US,remainsan unforgettablepresent to Japan from SidneySheldonbecause it was kindly and earnestly written for Japanese learners of English, responding to Mr.Tenma's unusual request. Probablycho-yakuhelped Sheldon'sbooks sell as well as in his home country, but itwas undoubtedlySheldon's genius instorytelling that kepthis Japanese fans absorbed in turning the page. 続きを見る
4.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.29-40,  2020-03-31.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: This paper is a guide to 50 books of Page Turners Reading Library published by Heinle, Cengage Learning, which area 12- level graded reading series of original stories from level 1(200 headwords) to level 12 (2600 headwords). Considering that other ordinary graded readers are divided into 6 levels, the 12 levels seem too minute to be useful. The concept of Page Turners, however, is quite successful in forcing the reader to turn pages with growing interest. Every Page Turners book is enjoyable just because it compels the reader to want to know what is going on, or what will happen next, which sometimes turns out to be not so interesting after all, though. In addition to how to read English, the reader can learn how to write fiction,especially, various techniques of arousing the reader’s curiosity and keeping his/her attention. The books from level 1 to level 4, set in a fictional Brenton College in the Unites States, are seemingly created as a companion series to Foundations Reading Library in which Bayview High School students' daily lives and extraordinary adventures are vividly described. Since the new heroes and heroines are older than the former counterparts, the stories are much more serious and far more complicated with adult conflicts. As a result, the protagonists can no longer stay around school; naturally the books from level 5 on to the end have nothing to do with Brenton College. Now the setting limitation is gone, stories are written as freely as possible. Many of these are the products of Cambridge English Readers authors like Sue Leather, Richard MacAndrew, Margaret Johnson, and Antoinette Moses. Page Turners makes good use of the forerunner's know-how, effectively adding a Macmillan English Readers-like illustrated introduction of characters before the text. Sue Leather and Julian Thomlinson's collaborated work Heart of a Fighter and Irene Barrall's unique, heartwarming story The Long Road to Lucca are highly recommended as excellent examples of this series. 続きを見る
5.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.53-64,  2020-03-31.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: Yoshinobu NISHIZAKI's 1978 anime movie Farewell to Space Battleship Yamato was a milestone in the history of Japan's animation, moving an audience of four million Japanese to tears at the ending where protagonist KODAI made a "Tokko" suicide attack on the White Comet in order to prevent it from invading the Earth. I, the author of this paper, saw the unforgettable film as a schoolboy knowing almost nothing about the background to the source of the powerful emotions. As I grew older, it became clear that we cried for the souls of the kamikaze members who chose to makeself-sacrifice just to defend their mother country Japan where their parents, siblings and friends lived; the crew of Japanese Navy's largest and strongest battleship Yamato were such unselfish patriots thinking first of other people's happiness. Through creating the Yamato series, NISHIZAKI devoted his life insisting on the true value of their deeds. Due to the postwar "peace" education in Japan, many of the ex-Yamato fans grew up to be typical Japanese adults who bitterly criticize the theme of Farewell to Space Battleship Yamato, ashamed of the tears they once shed. One of them Harutoshi FUKUI remade the legendary movie to Star Blazers 2202, removing the essence of NISHIZAKI's lifework. However, let us remember that it was the Yamato spirit that overcame the 2011 disaster of the Great East Japan Earthquake, and that Takashi YAMAZAKI's 2010 live-action movie Space Battleship Yamato was true to the original, paying a tribute to the memory of Yoshinobu NISHIZAKI(1934-2010). I also wrote this paper for him with not only respect but everlasting gratitude. 続きを見る
6.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.41-52,  2020-03-31.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: A talented producer Yoshinobu NISHIZAKI (1934-2010), who is famous for his legendary anime movie Farewell to Space Battl eship Yamato(1978), was disgraced as a "scoundrel" in his first biography titled The Man Who Made Space Battleship Yamato: The Madness of Yoshinobu NISHIZAKI(2015). Farewell to Space Battleship Yamato and its TV series Space Battleship Yamato II(1978-79) were recently remade as Star Blazers: Space Battleship Yamato 2202(2017-19) by Harutoshi FUKUI, novelist known for film versions of his original works such as Lorelei and Gundam Unicorn. Contrary to Yamato fans’ expectations, thenewYamato2202turned out to be a sheer failure, or another disgrace to the lamented NISHIZAKI. In this paper, a close comparison is made between Farewell to Space Battleship Yamato and Space Battleship Yamato 2202, with some reference to NISHIZAKI's other Yamato films and FUKUI's own novels. As a result, their themes are proved to be opposed to each other: NISHIZAKI, belonging to the war generation, evaluated "Tokko" suicide attacks as respectable acts to protect compatriots, while FUKUI,postwar democrat, blindly believes in the "Peace" Constitution of Japan given by the US general Douglass MacArthur, from which protagonist KODAI's unbelievably obsessive, pacifistic deeds originate. 続きを見る
7.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.21-32,  2019-04-26. 
概要: Paula Hawkins's sensational world bestseller A Girl on the Train (2015) was accepted as a psychological thriller as soon as it appeared. Her eagerly-awaited second novel Into the Water (2017), however, seems to have disappointed most of her fans who expected a still more exciting and mysterious thriller than her first one. In fact, one crime novel critic did not conceal his utter disappointment, mentioning it would not be the best choice for crime readers because "the mystery and suspense elements of this story take a backseat." Interestingly enough, he could not help admitting that the novel in question is beautifully written, and he even recommended this book he disliked to those who love literary fiction or women's fiction. After all, he is a good critic, correctly pointing out Into the Water is a novel which satisfies academic readers much more than crime fiction lovers. Despite the fact that many readers undoubtedly regard Ms. Hawkins as a crime writer, it is doubtful that she thinks of herself as one. Reportedly she has no interest in Sherlock Holmes, and her editor of Riverhead usually avoids such genre. Which shows that Paula Hawkins is a serious writer who, I imagine, likes great authors of English and American literature such as Henry James, Virginia Woolf, and even Herman Melville. Her notorious techniques in the new novel, like the frequent changes of more than ten point-of-view characters, appear to derive from the l9th-20th centuries' literary experiments. Perhaps a large number of people who want just an entertainment for a weekend night will be unexpectedly at a loss to find the book they bought so complicated that they can hardly understand what is going on and cannot afford to reason who killed Nel Abbot, although Ms. Hawkins prepares a lot of hints. If you want to enjoy Into the Water to your heart's content, you should read it at least twice. Contrary to your first impression, the novel is quite similar to A Girl on the Train: Libby (the same name of the unfortunate baby drowned in the bathtub) is drowned again by a mob of hateful men this time at the opening of the new book. Paula Hawkins's common theme becomes clear due to this repetition. The death of the first Libby was brought by Mac, the irresponsible man who left the young Megan when she most needed him. Tom, another egoistic man, killed Megan when he knew she was pregnant. The heroines Rachel and Anna, though they were ex-enemies, took revenge on him with a corkscrew. Into the Water is a double–plot novel consisting of Nel's mysterious death and Katie’s pathetic suicide. The former is a real whodunit which reminds me of Agatha Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926), but Ms. Hawkins prefers the latter with a strong, feministic massage somewhat related to #MeToo trend. Katie’s story is not a mystery at all. She loved secretly Mark Henderson, a good-looking teacher very popular among female students. Since Katie was still a fifteen-year-old girl, Henderson was afraid of being arrested and put into jail where he would probably be the target of manly convicts. Katie drowned herself, trying to prevent their forbidden relation from being known to the public. Lena, her best friend who loved her, exacted revenge on Henderson, stabbing him with a “nail” (a variation of the corkscrew in the first novel) and pushing him off a cliff. This bloody killing is not narrated, the scene intentionally omitted but alluded with enough hints. Seemingly, Paula Hawkins is disappointed in men completely in Into the Water, where there is no Kamal. Again she succeeds in letting her heroine kill unpunished another handsome man as the scapegoat for the violent men who have abused women for many years. 続きを見る
8.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.33-44,  2019-04-26. 
概要: This paper is a guide to Foundations Reading Library, the 1-7 level graded readers series of 42 full-color illustrated b ooks, whose characters are mainly fictional “Bayview High School” students of diverse origins including Japanese and Koreans in the United States. This series is quite unique since many of introductory graded readers generally tend to be children’s books, or fairy tales written for children. Of course, it cannot be denied both Grimm’s and Andersen’s masterpieces are still worth reading for young adults, and even the graded readers for English-speaking children like Oxford Reading Tree and Info Trails are also readable and informative for high school students learning English as a foreign language. In reality, however, ordinary, Japanese high school students, especially male students, avoid those books probably because they look too childish for them to choose. Although there are stories retold or newly written for such students, they do not seem interesting enough to attract their attention. As for Foundations Reading Library, the main characters of the series are ordinary, American high school students, whom the Japanese counterparts can easily sympathize with. American high school life always looks so attractive to them, for example, part-time jobs, skateboards, rock concerts, rock bands, basketball, sports meets, bike races, summer camps, and dances. Furthermore, this series includes some extraordinary adventures such as fights against gangsters and robbers. Far from boring, Foundations Reading Library provides ideal textbooks to those who want to enjoy learning English from the basics by themselves. 続きを見る
9.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.9-20,  2018-03-26.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: This is a critical essay on Bill O’Reilly’s American best-seller, Killing the Rising Sun: How America Vanquished World W ar II Japan (2016), which, soon introduced through the Internet, shocked some Japanese intellectuals. Considering the pitiless, ill-intentioned content for the Japanese, the book will never be translated into Japanese and probably remain unknown to ordinary people in Japan, many of whom like the United States. The writer of this essay, a Japanese scholar of comparative literature, analyzes how the atomic bombings are justified in Killing the Rising Sun, and criticizes the book using relevant materials, like the TV drama The Pacific produced by Steven Spielberg and Tom Hunks, which describes how innocent patriots like Eugene Sledge were to become coldblooded killers through the bloody battles against Japanese counterparts in Pacific islands like Peleliu; such theme is so universal that the series still has fans in Japan. The Japanese translation of Tears in the Darkness: the Story of the Bataan Death March and Its Aftermath, a wonderful book by Michael & Elizabeth Norman, also has succeeded in moving the Japanese readers with the two different perspectives of America and Japan, and the authors’ sympathetic attitudes toward the ex-enemies. For example, the so-called beasts did not use Japanese swords so often as the fans of Killing the Rising Sun might imagine: in Mr. and Mrs. Norman’s book, a Japanese officer used his precious weapon just after he knew that the captive had stolen some money from one of his dead soldiers. Bill O’Reilly, on the contrary, only tells stories about good Americans fighting bad Japanese. Since he uses the present tense showing how America comes to drop the atomic bombs, it is understandable that his hatred is keen enough to appreciate Truman’s decision to kill hundreds of thousands of Japanese civilians even though the president seems to have regretted to know that innocent women and children also died the most violent deaths ever known in human history. As Yuko Tojo, granddaughter of war-time prime minister Hideki Tojo, was welcomed by American veterans, offering flowers at the memorial service for the US marines in Peleliu in 1999, Japan and the United States are now close friends, having forgiven each other. Japan’s war crimes were severely punished at the International Military Tribunal for the Far East and other trials in foreign countries such as China, the Philippines, and Russia. Nearly one thousand Japanese were executed, some of whom had been wrongly accused and spent their agonizing last days. General Iwane Matsui, one of the unfortunate, had respected China and had ordered all his soldiers to maintain military discipline, but was hanged for the now-called Rape of Nanking. Having built Koua-Kannon (a statue of the Goddess of Mercy for the Rising Asia) in Atami, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan, the retired general had prayed every day for the souls of both the dead Japanese and Chinese soldiers. The Kannon statue still exists tenderly preserved by an elderly nun and her supporters. The world will admit that the Japanese are now peace-loving people. The atomic attacks are justified in Killing the Rising Sun in four ways: 1) by insisting that the Japanese were beasts; Tojo was a Hitler; Emperor Hirohito was incompetent, 2) by regarding the bombings as rightful revenge to Pearl Harbor, 3) by stressing that the two bombs saved “hundreds of thousands” of American soldiers, and 4) by mentioning that Bill O’Reilly was born thanks to the atomic bombs which saved the life of his future father who was about to take part in MacArthur’s land invasion of Japan. In answer to these, 1) The Japanese soldiers were not beasts, let alone women and children. Their violent acts were due to the nature of war itself. Somehow O’Reilly has omitted the last important sentence from the diary of a Japanese medical doctor who joined the killing of Chinese villagers: “War is truly terrible.” Tojo was no Hitler at all: as a believer in the future world free of racial discrimination, he let his subordinate Major General Higuchi save many Jews from the Nazis in Manchuria in 1938. No one can deny that the Emperor was a well-respected man leading the postwar Japan spiritually from the ashes to one of the wealthiest nations in the world. 2) Even the Tokyo trials rejected “the sneak attack.” The fact was, Japan was compelled to fight the unwanted war by President Roosevelt. 3) As Samuel J. Walker clarifies, the large number was a myth. Instead, “thousands” was said during the war. 4) Only this cannot be denied. It was a good thing that his father was alive. Yet it is more reasonable for Mr. O’Reilly to be grateful to the hundreds of thousands of Japanese substitutes, not to the terrible bombs. The Japanese people prefer to let bygones be bygones. In May 27, 2016, President Barak Obama said in Hiroshima, “We come to mourn the dead, including over 100,000 in Japanese men, women, children; thousands of Koreans; a dozen Americans held prisoners.” The US President was welcomed even by the aged, atomic bomb survivors. In conclusion, let us just set aside the heated disputes, and pray for all the war victims even if they were enemies. Mourning the dead is of crucial importance for world peace. 続きを見る
10.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.21-26,  2018-03-26.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: This is an introduction for young Japanese learners of English to e-future (Korean publisher)’s new graded comic readers series of Vera the Alien Hunter (2016) written by Jason Wilburn & Casey Kim, and illustrated by Seungjun Park & Bioh Kang. The wonderful writing team of Wilburn & Kim reminds us of their former excellent works: Magic Adventures (2012) and School Adventures (2014), in both of which the charming siblings Jack and Bella are actively involved, leading the stories to happy endings. Compared to these adventures, the new illustrations are somewhat inferior to Jaehwan Jung’s in techniques; the character designs are rather unoriginal (in fact, Luca will never fail to remind the reader of Japan’s well-loved manga character Dora-emon). However, the plot of Vera the Alien Hunter is so well-made that the reader will never be able to predict how the series of Vera and Luca may be concluded. It can be read as a graphic novel of the teacher-student relationship where Luca earnestly teaches and trains Vera until she becomes the earth’s reliable alien hunter. The theme is their friendship in a Western sense, but more accurately, the typical, Eastern cultural affection between teacher and student, which can be found similar to the relationship between the Japanese-like teacher Yoda and his disciple Luke Skywalker in Star Wars. In the theme song recorded in the attached CD, Luca says to his student, “You have to trust me. You have to do your best. I’ll help you learn the things you need to know,” and Vera answers, “Yes, I will trust you. I’ll learn all I can learn. I will succeed if I believe in me.” Interestingly, the message suggests that the reader will succeed in learning English if he or she trusts this set of textbooks. Through the interesting comic books, it might be possible to gain as great self-confidence as the obedient student Vera has done. 続きを見る
11.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.27-38,  2018-03-26.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: This paper is a comparative study on Lyman Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) and its musical movie version The Wizard of Oz (1939), referring to other movies like The Wiz (1978) and Oz the Great and Powerful (2013), TV series Emerald City (2017), several Japanese translations, and four graded reader versions published by Oxford, Compass, Macmillan, and IBC. It consists of six sections: 1) The Contrast of the Gray Kansas and the Colorful Oz World (Baum’s intentional gray versus color expressions are reflected in the famous switch from the black-and-white Kansas scenes to the color ones of the Land of Oz in the first Technicolor movie, whose technique the recent Disney film has imitated with the help of upgraded technology. One Japanese translator, however, somehow missed the keyword “gray,” and two out of the four graded reader writers omitted it). 2) Are Munchkins Abnormally Small? (Although Baum did not describe Munchkins as abnormally small, in the musical movie they were played by dwarfs from all over the United States. This movie’s influence has been so powerful that not only Oz the Great and Powerful but also three graded readers seem to follow suit). 3) Why Does Dorothy Want to Return to Kansas? (Dorothy explains to the Scarecrow, saying “there is no place like home” in the original book, which is faithfully repeated in the 1939 movie fortified with Aunt Em’s motherly devotion to the girl. Yet, this important phrase is not included in Compass and Macmillan). 4) How Japanese Translators Had Difficulties Translating “I”s of the Main Characters (Quite different from English, the Japanese language has several counterparts of “I,” depending on his or her personality, so Japanese translators had to interpret each character’s personality. Motoyuki Shibata, ex- Tokyo University professor of American literature and one of the leading novel translators in Japan, uniquely chose “watashi” for “I”s of Oz, the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, and the Cowardly Lion, presumably because they are symbolically parts of one man). 5) Is Emerald City Not Green? (In Baum’s book, Dorothy and her companions are made to wear green glasses, which Oz himself later admits to be his trick to make the city look greener. The movies show the Emerald City is really green enough as the young Oz in the 2013 Disney film says, “It’s a good thing my favorite color is green.” The graded readers, with the exception of IBC which is almost always true to the original plot, have two different simplifications: the green spectacles are necessary because the city is not green at all, or such glasses areunnecessary since, as in Oz the Great and Powerful, Emerald City is actually filled with greens. Oxford and Compass c hose the former, and Macmillan the latter). 6) The Limitations and Defects of Graded Readers (Except IBC, the graded readers excluded the final journey to meet Glinda, which turns out to be the abridged versions’ characteristic imperfections. Though the final part of Baum’s original book may appear to be redundant, it is full of unique characters, two of which are the fighting trees in the 1939 movie and China Girl in the 2013 one). The conclusion is that Lyman Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and the 1939 film version are now so closely related that both have mixedly influenced the later productions, including movies, Japanese translations, and even graded readers (Like Judy Garland, Oxford’s Dorothy wears “red shoes” instead of the Silver Shoes) . 続きを見る
12.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一 ; Yokoyama, Koichi
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.13-24,  2017-03-23.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: This paper is a complete guide to the 72 books written by Haruko Shogenji (1914-2015), one of Japan’s leading authors of children’s books. According to the trilogy of her autobiographical novels, she spent most of her childhood in the Tohoku region, and then, due to her father’s job transfer, her family moved to Kyoto, where she was bullied by her classmates, which was to turn into several novels, then they went to Korea under Japan’s colonial rule, where she felt uncomfortable, thinking it wrong to live happily in the foreign land. Experiencing the misery of World War II, Shogenji wrote, in her early career, about a girl who felt miserable with her family members staying at their relative’s home, always hungry during the war, and about a boy who lost his parents in an air raid, suffering a lot to live on his own. Some idealism after the war seems to have permeated all her works. Haruko Shogenji was good at describing the sensitive workings of children’s mind; their happiness as well as their sorrow. She wrote not only realistic fiction but also fantasy, for example, about ancient Egyptians she was very interested in. 続きを見る
13.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一 ; Yokoyama, Koichi
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.25-32,  2017-03-23.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: This is an introduction to two unique kinds of graded readers: Helbling Young Readers Fiction (2014), and e-future Grade d Comic Readers’ Jack and Bella series consisting of Magic Adventures (2012) and School Adventures (2014). The former, published in London, UK, are beautifully illustrated picture books such as The Beach (written by Rick Sampedro and illustrated by Agilulfo Russo), The Sun is Broken (written by Andrés Pi Andreu and illustrated by Catty Flores), and Henry Harris Hates Haitches (written by Maria Cleary and illustrated by Lorenzo Sabbatini), all of which are good examples of wonderful collaboration between an author and an illustrator. Although the main purpose of graded readers is to make learners accustomed to reading in English, some of these books are so artistic that they are really worth much more recognition by avid book lovers all over the world. It is such a relief to know that there is at least a “Language Learner Literature Award,” which was rightly given to Maria Cleary and Lorenzo Sabbatini’s Skater Boy, the very simple but quite powerful picture book about a mysterious boy hero. The latter, published in Seoul, Korea, is a readable series of comic books, which must be far more enjoyable among children who, whether they like it or not, have to study the international language, for Jason Wilburn and Casey Kim’s story-making is so splendid (in fact they are genius in combining the evil force of the crystal with environmental problems in “Dark’s Hearts” of Magic Adventures, and in retelling children’s classics like Peter Pan, The Wizard of Oz, and Robin Hood in “Storybook Mysteries” of School Adventures, using their own protagonists: Jack and Bella) and Jaehwan Jung’s anime-like character design is so charming that the results turn out to be another instance of successful collaboration. Therefore it is strongly recommended that both Magic and School Adventures be read as fantastic works of manga on their own, not just as tools for learning English. 続きを見る
14.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.1-11,  2017-03-23.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: This paper is a minute study about Majutsu wa sasayaku written by Japan’s most popular mystery novelist Miyuki Miyabe, a nd its 1980s’ background. The novel was published in 1989, at the peak of the “bubble” economy in which the nation flourished more than ever, and many girls enjoyed luxurious lifestyles dating handsome boyfriends and sometimes some of them met other men for money or fun without conscience, more freely than ever. A keen observer, Ms. Miyabe critically described such tendency, focusing on the loneliness and suffering of the unfortunate who were not popular with girls; the serious but ignored problem was to be at last dealt with in 1999 by the male literary critic Atsushi Koyano in his bestseller Motenai otoko (A Man Unpopular with Girls). Therefore, Majutsu wa sasayaku deserves a wider recognition that it is not so much an interesting mystery novel of a hypnotist-killer as a precious document about Japan in the 1980s. The English translation of Majutsu wa sasayaku came out under the title of The Devil’s Whisper in 2007. Considering the fact that it was 18 years after the publication of the original, the release seems a bit too late. Maybe that was the reason that “198X,” the very first word of the Japanese text in Prologue, was intentionally eliminated. Unless the readers of this English version know that it is the translation of the old book, they will tend to start reading it as a story of Japan in this 21st century. But of course, they will notice sooner or later that the scenes are those of the 1980s because there are neither cell phones, not to mention smartphones, nor the Internet, and the 1987 movie The Last Emperor (directed by Bernardo Bertolucci) and American actresses such as Brooke Shields and Phoebe Cates are mentioned in the novel. In conclusion, The Devil’s Whisper would have been a much better book if it had included “198X,” actually, either 1988 or 1989 according to the conversation about The Last Emperor, which was released in Japan in January, 1988. The English translator should have made it clear with both exact translations of proper nouns (like Almond Roppongi) and their explanatory notes that the novel vividly describes the socalled bubble period of Japan. 続きを見る
15.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一 ; Yokoyama, Koichi
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.21-31,  2016-03-15.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: This is a close examination of the English translation (2005) of Miyuki Miyabe’s Crossfire (1998) so as to show how the Japanese mystery is translated into English. It will be helpful for future translators to know some rules and methods revealed in this paper. By following the painful efforts of the two translators, Deborah Stuhr Iwabuchi and Anna Husson Isozaki, I have generalized such know-how. While evaluating the two women’s work, I point out their careless mistakes. Whether on purpose or not, some omissions seem to be rather serious defects. Of course, other seeming weak points are not necessarily their faults. There are definite limits of translation, especially from Japanese into English: The nuances of some Japanese words like ofukuro and obasan are impossible to express in English. The young waiter’s distinctive way of talking also cannot be translated; his funny tones completely disappear in the English version, but that is an exact example of the impossibility of translation. The paper consists of seven sections: Introduction: a summary of Crossfire, 1) the opening dream (contrary to the original, the English version cannot hide that the dreamer is a woman), 2) various ways of using italics (effective for emphasis, especially in inner monologues), 3) English counterparts of police terms (because of Captain Ito, the original “Captain” is changed into “Skipper”), 4) Chinese characters (in most cases, the meanings of kanji are just ignored, yet the ironical, literal meaning of Kei-ichi, the name of a criminal, is explained properly; Seika-Gakuen, a proper noun, is even translated as Essence Academy), 5) the limits of English translation and some countermeasures (literal translation is often meaningless to foreign readers, so English substitutes will be useful like cake for sekihan), and Conclusion: examples of bad omission and good translation (although several impressive scenes and words are carelessly removed, most of the thematic lines are duly translated). The best thing about the English version is that it includes the key word “crossfire,” because it is not found in the original text, and most Japanese readers do not know what it really means even though it is the title of the novel they have enjoyed. 続きを見る
16.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一 ; Yokoyama, Koichi
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.33-40,  2016-03-15.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: This paper is a guide to 25 Easy Story House books and 15 Popcorn ELT Readers, both of which are a kind of picture books for young learners of English in about the same levels, though they are from different publishers. The former collects a wide range of famous stories for children from legendary folk tales, mostly Grimm’s Fairy Tales such as Thumbelina, Rumpelstiltskin, and Rapunzel, to modern creations like Oscar Wilde’s The Selfish Giant, and Margery Williams’ The Velveteen Rabbit. The latter gathers animated films, especially Hollywood’s hit series like Shrek, Ice Age, Madagascar, and Kung Fu Panda. In comparison, it is likely that Popcorn ELT Readers produced by the larger publishing firm Scholastic will attract more readers because of their much familiar, movie characters, which feature the front covers. It is surely fun to look at still pictures from the movies; yet, it is rather boring to read the outline of an animation movie just because it is stripped of its motions, voices, music, and special effects, all of which make the movie interesting. Easy Story House books are more enjoyable to read even if young readers are less interested in unfamiliar, old folk tales. Above all Grimm’s Fairy Tales (I recommend The Wonderful Musician and Henny Penny) are immortal and definitely worth reading. WorldCom ELT decorates the series with unique illustrations by talented Korean artists. 続きを見る
17.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一 ; Yokoyama, Koichi
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.41-52,  2016-03-15.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: This paper is a comparative study on four graded reader versions of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818, revised 1831) in order to show how the original (all the readers except Macmillan are based on the 1831 book in which Frankenstein’s mother finds and adopts Elizabeth) is changed into simplified books depending on each writer’s interpretations. Eight important elements, which seem to make up the plot, are closely examined: 1) the beginning of the book, 2) Frankenstein’s relationship with Elizabeth, 3) Frankenstein’s interest and study, 4) the death of William, 5) the monster’s language acquisition, 6) the monster’s hope and despair, 7) the death of Elizabeth, and 8) Frankenstein’s revenge. On the whole Compass Classic Readers is the truest to Mary Shelley’s 1831 original story, keeping Captain Walton’s letters to his sister as the framework of this novel, as well as the Turkish lady Safie (Oxford changes to Sophie, and the other two ignore) whose lessons of the French language make it possible for the monster to learn how to speak and read. Although the Compass writer, Ken Methold, forgets to mention the death of Frankenstein’s loving mother, he manages the conflicting views of Frankenstein and the monster. Penguin Active Reading also retains the atmosphere of the original, keeping Walton’s letters, which are much shortened though. Penguin is the only book which includes Frankenstein’s last words. The adapter Deborah Tempest, however, apparently fails to grasp the importance of the fire motif: The monster does not learn the word “fire” at the de Lacey’s and says that he will die in the ice, not flames. In Oxford Bookworms, Patrick Nobes removes the letter frame but makes use of Walton as a witness: He happens to catch a glimpse of the monster from his ship, which makes the first page most exciting among the five books including the original. Yet, Nobes misses writing about Walton’s expedition to the North Pole, so Frankenstein’s story does not become a lesson to him. Contrary to Mary Shelley’s text, the Oxford writer describes how Frankenstein uses the electricity of lightning to create the monster, which is obviously influenced by Hollywood movies like James Whale’s 1931 Frankenstein. This addition may satisfy the readers’ curiosity since Mrs. Shelly herself did not clear the way to give life. The most unique adaptation of Frankenstein (seemingly the first 1818 edition, as Frankenstein’s father takes in Elizabeth) is Macmillan Readers. Margaret Tarner is bold enough to omit Captain Walton and to let Frankenstein tell his own story directly to the readers of her adapted book. Accordingly the change leads to a completely different ending: Instead of Walton, Frankenstein himself meets and talks with the monster at the end; in striking contrast to Mrs. Shelly’s original ending, it is Frankenstein who apologizes; after the monster leaves to kill himself, Frankenstein also decides to die in the cold. It cannot be denied that the Macmillan version has become a powerful story on its own, but it is doubtful that this graded reader deserves the name of Mary Shelley on its front cover. 続きを見る
18.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一 ; Yokoyama, Koichi
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.15-26,  2015-03-16.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: The present paper is the final sequel to ‘ “English Communication I”: A Guide to New Textbooks Authorized by the Ministr y of Education in Japan’ (March, 2013) and ‘ “English Communication II”: A Guide to New 2014-2017 English Textbooks Authorized by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan’ (March, 2014). The trilogy shows the new contents and tendencies of current English textbooks used at Japanese high schools. Although the name of the subject has been changed from English Reading to Communication English III, the newly published textbooks for the third-year students are just the same in that the highest aim is to acquire the basic reading skills so that they can pass entrance examinations to Japanese universities. Of course, a new kind of activities such as “Make a presentation about the innovator you respect or you are interested in in pairs or groups.” and “Tell your classmates about a “lucky” experience you had.” are added to the new textbooks, which, however, seems a sheer compromise between Japanese teachers of English and Japan’s Ministry of Education; the former generally believe it more appropriate and essential to teach how to read English, while the latter want to drastically change the traditional, or in their words, “old-fashioned” classroom English and to produce as many fluent English speakers as possible, fearing that the nation will drop out of the severe, international economic competition due to the poor command of the international language, compared with the spiteful, neighboring rivals like South Korea and China, whose people, somehow, appear to have the ability to speak better English. 続きを見る
19.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一 ; Yokoyama, Koichi
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.27-33,  2015-03-16.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: This paper is a simple guide to Info Trail, the unique series of 78 English textbooks of geography, history and science. Info Trail is a sort of graded readers for elementary school children in Britain, consisting of four stages: beginner, emergent, competent, and fluent stages. The authors often introduce completely different ideas and tell stories in the form of debate, asking at the end “What do you think?” Various questions include whether you are for or against, say, the construction of a huge supermarket, the monarchy, and dangerous space exploration, all of which are generally considered in Japan as adult matters. It is likely that through these books children will be able to think by themselves and have their own opinions. In this sense, Info Trail helps young readers grow into responsible members of their democratic societies. Which seems to be the very ideal aim of this series that is worth imitating among Japanese educators of English. The Info Trail books can be also enjoyed by foreign learners of English whether you are a student or an adult. Originally intended for school kids, the series is much easier for adult readers to understand and appreciate. In fact Info Trail is not boring at all even to adults. Though partly childish to be sure, the contents are wonderfully written in order to stimulate the readers’ interest and imagination. For example, “From an Acorn to an Oak Tree” is a little masterpiece, which may touch your heart. History is described clearly and sympathetically as if it had happened to your friends only yesterday. Science deals with the thrilling adventures of distinguished men like Edward Jenner and Charles Darwin, satisfying mature readers’ intellectual curiosity. 続きを見る
20.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一 ; Yokoyama, Koichi
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.35-46,  2015-03-16.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: This paper is a comparative study on four different graded readers of Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden (1909) with the main purpose of clarifying how adaptations are made from the original. Closely compared with Burnett’s writing, the four versions (Compass Classic Readers, Penguin Active Reading, Oxford Bookworms, and Macmillan Readers) will show their own characteristics. As the easiest of all, Compass version is naturally the shortest digest, omitting even some of the most impressive scenes such as Colin defying Ben and standing up from his wheelchair, and Mr. Craven’s supernatural dream of his deceased wife calling him home as if to make possible his touching reconciliation with his son Colin, who, with the help of “Magic” as well as with his great efforts, has gained the ability to walk. Although Oxford’s stage 3 version is longer and truer to the original than Compass, it also has a few bad points. Because of the publisher’s strict rules of restricting vocabulary, the Oxford book includes absurd-looking changes like “plant,” instead of ivy, covering the door to the secret garden, and Colin’s first words to Mary in their midnight encounter, “Are you a dream?” replacing the frightful expression “Are you a ghost?” On the whole, Macmillan’s pre-intermediate level of The Secret Garden appears to be the best adapted book just because it is truest to Burnett’s classic. What is interesting is, this study has discovered an unexpected merit of graded readers: A retold version may have the possibility of moving the people who read it more than the very original. Penguin version is a good example. In this elementary level 2 book, Anne Colins has managed to modernize the 1909 novel, focusing on the wealthy mother’s total indifference to Mary. Such neglect happens to be one of today’s social problems quite common in developed countries, and undoubtedly tends to draw modern readers’ attention. Furthermore, Ms. Colins intentionally weakens the outdated class element like the 10- year-old aristocrat Colin ordering arrogantly the elderly servant Ben Weatherstaff, which is loyally retained in Macmillan’s counterpart. Penguin version avoids the name of “Master Colin,” using untitled “Colin Craven.” In conclusion, it can be said that the most preferred graded readers are not necessarily the ones which are always loyal to the masterpiece. 続きを見る
21.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.7-18,  2014-03-14.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: The present paper is a complete guide to the English textbooks currently used at junior high schools in Japan, introducing the contents of all the 18 books, 6 different sets issued by six publishing companies: the so-called Big Three (NEW HORIZON, SUNSHINE, NEW CROWN), ONE WORLD, TOTAL ENGLISH, and a newcomer, Mitsumura Tosho's COLUMBUS 21, all of which were authorized by the Japanese Ministry of Education in 2011. In comparison with high school textbooks, they are much more interesting, full of encouragement to read, write, listen to, and speak English. Although the textbooks for the third year students tend to become more serious and moralistic like typical high school textbooks, they still retain humorous and touching elements, strangely enough, which are lacking almost completely in the high school counterparts. It is obvious that junior high English textbooks are well-made for beginners with ingenious methods: above all, each publishing company has created anime/manga-like characters just the same age of the students and made the three-year textbooks in the form of a novel. This paper shows how charming these characters are and what good effects they have on the students as well as the story itself. Despite the fact that the 80 to 90 percent market share has been exclusively secured by the three major publishers, it can be said that TOTAL ENGLISH is excellent in character designs and COLUMBUS 21 the best as a teenage novel. 続きを見る
22.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.19-29,  2014-03-14.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: The present paper is the sequel to '"English Communication I': A Guide to New Textbooks Authorized by the Ministry of Education in Japan" (March, 2013), dealing with twenty new "English Communication II" textbooks authorized by the Japanese Ministry of Education in 2013. Seemingly panicked by the disastrous results of its erroneous yutori policy, the Ministry has started a revised educational program, not only making the English textbooks far more difficult, but also ordering all the Japanese high school teachers of English to teach the foreign language to Japanese students in English itself. After all the confusion that the responsible Ministry caused perhaps unintentionally in the previous year, the newly published textbooks for the second year students, which are going to be used for upcoming four years, from 2014 to 2017, seem to have returned to the former state: the instructive pages of "Classroom English" printed in English Communication I textbooks having almost completely disappeared, the contents of English Communication II textbooks look both old and familiar in spite of being the newly- named subject with the key word "communication." This paper consists of the general introduction and the brief outline of each textbook, including some critical comments on the typical, too moralistic themes which have nothing to do with the study of English and undoubtedly will only prevent ambitious teenagers from enjoying learning the international language, ironically again, contrary to the good intentions of Japan's Ministry of Education. 続きを見る
23.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.31-42,  2014-03-14.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: The present paper is intended as a useful guide to Compass Classic Readers, the complete set of 60 books with MP3 CDs, which are divided into 6 levels from 400 to 1500 headwords. Compared with other major publishing companies' counterparts, the Compass books may look inferior due to their cheap- looking cover designs. Some of the attached CDs are also badly made with narrators' poor performances and mismatched music. Of course, there are good points that can cover these defects: the MP3 CDs include "Playlet" where each title is partly or wholly made into a short play probably in order to accustom the learners to English conversations; on the whole Compass Classic Readers are nicely selected and properly retold almost always true to the originals. It might be surprising that foreign learners of English with their limited vocabularies can gain easy access to wonderful masterpieces such as Shakespeare's comedies and tragedies like A Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth Night, Othello, Macbeth, and so forth. It is true that most of the Compass classics are so famous that they are available in other publishers' versions, and Japanese people can read them in full-length translation from the originals; yet it is certain that Compass Classic Readers are one of the easiest ways to catch a glimpse of world classics, especially those by British and American authors. It is strongly recommended that Compass Classic Readers should be read as an ideal introduction to get acquainted with great novels and plays that Western civilization has ever produced. 続きを見る
24.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.31-42,  2013-03-14.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: The present paper has been written as a useful guide to new “English Comminication I” textbooks, which are going to be u sed at high schools and colleges of technology in Japan from April of 2013. These English readers, newly authorized by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, have attracted much attention from not only Japanese teachers of English, but also the general public who has been demanding more effective language education that will quickly and surely enable their children to acquire the ability of speaking English. Apparently, Japan’s Ministry of Education has felt a great deal of responsibility for this serious situation, and has irresponsibly tried thrusting it to the classroom. As a result, most of these new textbooks are filled with much more text and far more activities as well as still more grammar. Despite the fact that most Japanese people and the Ministry of Education wish to imagine the future Japan where many can speak English fluently, the English Comminication I textbooks in question, strangely enough, have turend out to be little different from the former “English I” textbooks in that the main part is not for speaking, but for reading whose moral topics are familiar to experienced teachers: world peace, equality, environmental problems and so forth. This paper provides a brief outline of 22 English Comminication I textbooks, showing their characteristics and the contents of every lesson, such as Nelson Mandela, the first black president of South Africa, who made the most of the 1995 Rugby World Cup to unite his newly reborn country, and Tsutomu Yamaguchi (1916-2010), the only human being who was unfortunate enough to experience the atomic bombings both in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but fortunate enough to survive the disasters. 続きを見る
25.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.43-51,  2013-03-14.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: The present paper introduces Penguin Active Reading, a new series of English graded readers. These green-covered, beau tiful books apparently stand out among various kinds of graded readers in that they are larger-sized and full-color with more exercises for comprehension. It is true that the series consists mostly of some uninteresting, original works of fiction written with restricted vocabulary, and a number of abridged versions of already overly famous masterpieces from English and American literature, such as William Shakespeare’s great plays, Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist, Jack London’s The Call of the Wild and so on, most of which are available from other publishers. Nevertheless, Penguin Active Reading has managed to include outstanding books from around the world, for example, the Chinese classic The Monkey King and the Greek counterpart The Odyssey, both of which are worthwhile and can be currently read as simplified graded readers only in this series. To the joy of Japanese readers, Penguin has rediscovered the value of Lafcadio Hearn’s book of Japanese ghost stories, Kwaidan, which is very popular in Japan but almost forgotten in Western countries. Penguin has also succeeded in finding curious materials from movies: E.T., Peter Jackson’s King Kong, Mr Bean, Sweeney Todd, The Full Monty, etc. It is recommended that the students at Gunma National College of Technology use this paper as a guide and read as many books as possible in order to study English on their own. 続きを見る
26.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.53-61,  2013-03-14.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: The present paper has been made as an introduction to Cambridge English Readers, dealing with 84 books with CDs, all of which are divided into 7 grades from “starter/beginner” to “advanced” levels. In general, what we call graded readers tend to be mainly made up of well-known English and American masterpieces specially rewritten for foreign learners of English with easier, limited vocabularies. Cambridge University Press, however, has boldly decided to make the series consist of only original novels and stories, which is certainly the most outstanding characheristic of Cambridge English Readers. In fact, the publisher seems to have a lot of confidence in this feature, boasting on the back cover of each book: “Cambridge English Readers is an exciting series of original fiction, (…) the stories in this series provide easy and enjoyable reading on a wide range of contemporary topics and themes.” Although it cannot be denied that some of the series might turn out to not be as enjoyable as advertised, Cambridge English Readers are on the whole worth reading as ideal books for those who want to read novels in English. The paper provides a gereral introduction to Cambridge English Readers, and brief summaries of the 84 books. Richard MacAndrew, Sue Leather, Margaret Johnson, and Antoinette Moses are regular Cambridge novelists; Frank Brennan has written a variety of interesting short stories for the series. There are several books with Japanese as main characters, for example, Judith Wilson’s Staying Together and Michael Austen’s Berlin Express. The former is a love story and the latter a thriller, both of which can be fully appreciated especially among young Japanese students of English. 続きを見る
27.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.91-100,  2012-03-16.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: This is an introduction to the complete pack of Macmillan readers with audio CDs: 104 simplified but still readable titl es. Compared with the perfectly graded Oxford Bookworms, the series is rather roughly classified with less attractive illustrations, yet the stories are still worth reading. To the joy of the readers, Macmillan Languagehouse has chosen a variety of interesting masterpieces as material, many of which are also available from Oxford University Press, but Macmillan has managed to discover some, not-so-famous, fine works such as Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey and Anne Bronte’s The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. It is certain that the publisher has been eager to find far more enjoyable texts the rivals have missed. James Bond 007, Meg Cabot’s The Princess Diaries, and the novelized versions of the popular American TV drama, Dawson’s Creek, are surely good examples that Macmillan must be proud of. What is more, it is worth noting the Macmillan Readers’ attached CDs are superior to Oxford Bookworms’ in that most of them include sound effects as well as impressive theme music. 続きを見る
28.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.101-112,  2012-03-16.  群馬工業高等専門学校
概要: The present paper provides the students at Gunma National College of Technology with brief summaries of the Oxford Reading Tree stories, literacy textbooks originally published for children at British primary schools. Today the series are being read all over the world, including Japan, where English has recently become a required subject at elementary schools and as a natural result parents have much keener interest in earlier foreign language training for their children at home. No doubt Oxford Reading Tree stories are ideal textbooks for young beginners of English. The author Roderick Hunt has written the funny, heartwarming, and fantastic stories mostly about three young siblings: Kipper, Biff, and Chip; the illustrator Alex Brychta has charmingly designed not only these main characters but also minor ones such as their dog Floppy, their Gran and their school friends, with his wonderful pictures. Their collaborative works can be enjoyed and probably even more appreciated among older learners of English. Thus it is highly recommended that the students at our school read the stories and listen to the attached audio CDs in order to improve their abilities of English as an international language. 続きを見る
29.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.29-36,  2010-03-15.  群馬工業高等専門学校
30.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.19-26,  2009-03-12.  群馬工業高等専門学校
31.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.1-15,  2009-03-12.  群馬工業高等専門学校
32.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.71-78,  2008-03-19.  群馬工業高等専門学校
33.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.1-12,  2008-03-19.  群馬工業高等専門学校
34.

論文(AKAGI収録)

論文(AKAGI収録)
横山, 孝一
出版情報: 群馬高専レビュー.  pp.1-7,  2007-03-23.  群馬工業高等専門学校